Japan

Relatives and Robots: A Conversation on Elder Care in Japan with James Wright and Jason Danely

The sudden urgent discussions around Artificial Intelligence (AI) flooding into every aspect of our lives has sparked a resurgence of interest in the topic of robot caregivers. In Italy, Europe’s oldest country, some think robots will be able to fill the gap left by shrinking families and concerns about the sustainability of its system of […]

Relatives and Robots: A Conversation on Elder Care in Japan with James Wright and Jason Danely Read More »

Those Who Come Early

Generations in Japan are fragmented. Society lacks structures to create solidarities between them (which is a very Western, and thus foreign idea anyway). Is it naïve to think the brutal fact of a higher COVID-19 mortality rate for the aged might inspire sympathy rather than division? The criticism aimed at seniors queueing at drugstores has been just one of the everyday side-effects of COVID-19, one that naturalizes moral judgements against older bodies in public spaces.

Those Who Come Early Read More »

Futures Past: Absent Kinships and the Japanese Child Welfare System

Assigned to write about “futures” in the context of childhood, I find myself dwelling on the past. Although approaches to childhood often must grapple with how “the child” is seen to signify the future (of a family, of a town, of a nation, of humanity), within child welfare systems, which are the context of my

Futures Past: Absent Kinships and the Japanese Child Welfare System Read More »

Anthropology & Aging Vol.36 no.1

The June 2015 issue of Anthropology & Aging features the latest commentaries, articles, and reviews, available free now through our open-access agreement. In addition to our usual content, this issue includes a commentary/response format first introduced in the special issue on the body (33.3) and reintroduced in this issue by Maruta Vitols and Caitrin Lynch’s piece

Anthropology & Aging Vol.36 no.1 Read More »

From Being to Ontogenetic Becoming: Commentary on Analytics of the Aging Body Ender Ricart, University of Chicago

Anthropology & Aging Quarterly Volume 34, issue 3 (September 2013) pp.52-60 From Being to Ontogenetic Becoming: Commentary on Analytics of the Aging Body Ender Ricart Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago Download Full PDF here:AAQ34(3)RICART Responses Katrina L. Moore, Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, University of New South Wales (followed by author response) Athena McLean,

From Being to Ontogenetic Becoming: Commentary on Analytics of the Aging Body Ender Ricart, University of Chicago Read More »

Scroll to Top