Tag: Japan

Those Who Come Early

Generations in Japan are fragmented. Society lacks structures to create solidarities between them (which is a very Western, and thus foreign idea anyway). Is it naïve to think the brutal fact of a higher COVID-19 mortality rate for the aged might inspire sympathy rather than division? The criticism aimed at seniors queueing at drugstores has been just one of the everyday side-effects of COVID-19, one that naturalizes moral judgements against older bodies in public spaces.

Futures Past: Absent Kinships and the Japanese Child Welfare System

Assigned to write about “futures” in the context of childhood, I find myself dwelling on the past. Although approaches to childhood often must grapple with how “the child” is seen to signify the future (of a family, of a town, of a nation, of humanity), within child welfare systems, which are the context of my […]

Anthropology & Aging Vol.36 no.1

The June 2015 issue of Anthropology & Aging features the latest commentaries, articles, and reviews, available free now through our open-access agreement. In addition to our usual content, this issue includes a commentary/response format first introduced in the special issue on the body (33.3) and reintroduced in this issue by Maruta Vitols and Caitrin Lynch’s piece […]

From Being to Ontogenetic Becoming: Commentary on Analytics of the Aging Body Ender Ricart, University of Chicago

Anthropology & Aging Quarterly Volume 34, issue 3 (September 2013) pp.52-60 From Being to Ontogenetic Becoming: Commentary on Analytics of the Aging Body Ender Ricart Department of Anthropology, University of Chicago Download Full PDF here:AAQ34(3)RICART Responses Katrina L. Moore, Lecturer, School of Social Sciences, University of New South Wales (followed by author response) Athena McLean, […]

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