Tag Archives: awards

Anthropology & Aging Vol.36 no.1

AAQ35(1)cover_3sm

link to the issue

The June 2015 issue of Anthropology & Aging features the latest commentaries, articles, and reviews, available free now through our open-access agreement. In addition to our usual content, this issue includes a commentary/response format first introduced in the special issue on the body (33.3) and reintroduced in this issue by Maruta Vitols and Caitrin Lynch’s piece on representations of aging in films and a reflective response by A&A co-editor Philip Kao. Stephanie May de Montigny’s Portfolio continues this discussion of performance, narrative, and creativity on the stage. We hope these contributions spark more interest and interaction here on our blog as well as in cafes and classrooms everywhere!

Every issue of Anthropology & Aging that we produce depends on the skills and time volunteered by our editorial staff, our board, peer reviewers, and digital publishing support. This issue is especially exciting because also it showcases the work happening across the Association of Anthropology and Gerontology—from supporting student work with the Margaret Clark Award, to the international conference held last February.

Anthropology & Aging 36(1) begins with an commentary adapted from the keynote address delivered by past International President of Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders  (MSF), Dr. Unni Karunakara at the 2015 AAGE Conference on “Health Disparities in Aging” hosted by Florida International University. Dr. Karunakara writes from the front lines of global public health and humanitarian response, and his evaluation of the recognition (or lack thereof) of the important roles of older people in high risk, post-disaster circumstances reveals the need to rethink how aid organizations are held accountable for including older adults as a priority in their work.

In addition to Dr. Karunakara’s Keynote, the AAGE conference also provided a chance for our organization to support student research and professionalization. One of our banner activities in this regard has been the awarding of the Margaret Clark award for student papers. In 2014 AAGE awarded two Margaret Clark Awards, one at the graduate level (Ben Kasstan, Durham University), and another at the undergraduate level (Lilly Lerer, University of Chicago). The awardees both revised their papers into articles and braved the peer-review process to be accepted for publication in A&A. Ben Kasstan’s article focuses on the voices and experiences of Shoah survivors at a UK day center mediate their experiences of past trauma by incorporating elements of Judaism, literally through food and memory. Lilly Lerer’s article is a sensitive and intimate account of her fieldwork with hospice patients and staff as they mutually embody a temporality of ‘slow care’ that contrasts with the efficient and cure-centered care of the biomedical end of life settings.

Care is a theme running throughout this issue, and, as the authors note, throughout current discussions of doing anthropology in the Anthropocene. Two additional articles in this issue take up the theme of care for older adults. Iza Kavedžija’s ethnographically rich depiction of community care in urban Japan looks at the co-productions of categories of ‘elderly’ and ‘carer’ as individuals move through various care settings, employing symbolic and linguistic cues that mark roles and relationships along a spectrum of social potentialities. Fetterolf, a student member of AAGE, examines healing in Alzheimer’s care in the US, adopting a case study approach, proposing that close attention to personhood creates ‘bridges’ to providing better care.

Enjoy this issue and we look forward to bringing you our next special issue on “Aging the Technoscape” in the Fall. CFP is still open until June 30 for this issue, and general submissions on other topics are always welcome!

FAQ for Margaret Clark Award

Answers to frequently asked questions about the 2014 Margaret Clark Award competition will be posted here:

Q: Who counts as a student?

A: For eligibility purposes, someone counts as a student if they are enrolled in an undergraduate or graduate program, or have been accepted into a graduate program with enrollment occurring in 2014, at the time that they submit their entry.

 

Q: Can I submit a paper to the competition that I have also submitted to a journal for publication?

A: No.  Winning papers will be given right of first refusal for publication in Anthropology & Aging.

Margaret Clark Award For Student Papers: Deadline June 1, 2014

Award Competition

AAGE is invites graduate and undergraduate students to submit papers of interest to anthropology and gerontology to compete for the Margaret Clark Award. This award supports the continued pursuit of work following the example of Margaret Clark, a pioneer in the multidisciplinary study of socio-cultural gerontology and medical anthropology, and a scholar committed to mentoring younger colleagues.

Winning papers will receive $300, and the jurors may select papers for Honorable Mention with a free AAGE year membership. Winning papers will be given the right of first refusal by Anthropology & Aging and acknowledged at the American Anthropological Association annual meeting. Abstracts of the winning manuscripts will also be published on the AAGE website.

Applicants

Contributions are invited from students of all disciplines and methods.  Non-members and members are invited to apply.  We welcome submissions that are research, analytic, or literary in nature, and academic, applied or practice oriented.

Essays will be judged on the following criteria:

  • Originality and timeliness of topic.
  • Effective use of theory and evidence.
  • Significance to anthropological studies of aging.
  • Clear and effective writing and organization.

Published or accepted manuscripts are ineligible for this competition.  Limit one entry per student.

Submission of Manuscripts

Submissions must include the following as a single MS Word document:

  • Title page with the following information
    • Undergraduate or graduate status
    • Name, mailing address and institutional affiliation and email address (and future contact information if a change is anticipated).
    • Brief (150-200 words) abstract
  • Manuscript should be double-spaced with references in any standard bibliographic format (e.g. American Anthropologist, American Psychological Association).

Deadline

Materials must be submitted by June 1. Only complete submissions will be considered. Submissions and related questions should be sent to both award chairs via email with “Margaret Clark Award” in the subject line:

Elana Buch: elana-buch@uiowa.edu

Emily Wentzell: emily-wentzell@uiowa.edu

ASA Graduate Student Award Deadline: 11/30

Submit your research paper to the American Society on Aging to be considered for the graduate student research award! The winner will gain the recognition of peers and thousands of professionals in the field. The graduate student research award is given to spur academic and clinical interest in the field of aging and rewards the best unpublished graduate research paper on a completed project relevant to aging and applicable to practice. Membership in ASA is not a requirement, but is a consideration.

Applicants must be enrolled in a graduate-degree program or have completed their studies less than one year before submission, and be sponsored by a faculty member. The winner will receive a $500 honorarium, an opportunity to present their paper at the 2013 Aging in America conference (March 12-16 in Chicago), complimentary one-year student ASA membership and registration for the Aging in America conference.

The deadline to submit research papers has been extended to November 30. Call 415-974-9600 if you have any questions, or visit:

http://www.asaging.org/graduate-student-award