Author: narelle.warren@monash.edu

Risky business: how older ‘at risk’ people in Denmark evaluated their situated risk during the COVID-19 pandemic

By Amy Clotworthy and Rudi G.J. Westendorp Center for Healthy Aging (CEHA), Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen The COVID-19 pandemic has presented us with a unique opportunity to examine how societies perceive urgent biological risk, and how they manage population groups who may be susceptible to such risks (cf. Alaszewski 2015). When the World […]

New traditions: A reflection on changed Easter traditions

By Danielle Corrie In this latest post in our ‘The Age of COVID-19’ series, author Danielle Corrie reflects on how pandemic-related restrictions changed her family’s Easter traditions. In doing so, she highlights how the traditions are kept alive through intergenerational connections and efforts. Easter comes and goes each autumn in Australia, yet this Easter (2020) […]

As visiting restrictions continue, elders in Danish plejehjem are experiencing a ‘stolen spring’

By Amy Clotworthy, Center for Healthy Aging (CEHA), University of Copenhagen (Denmark) First published in 1940, Hans Scherfig’s The Stolen Spring (Det Forsømte Forår) is both a satirical crime novel and a wry social commentary. Through his description of a school’s sociocultural dynamics and how administrators handle the murder of a teacher, Scherfig pointedly criticises particular […]

It takes two to tango

By Miriam Verhage, Lucia Thielman, Lieke de Kock, Jolanda Lindenberg This blog post is based on a phone-based qualitative interview project in the Netherlands. During April 2020, we interviewed 59 seniors about their experiences during the COVID-19 crisis and their views on the portrayal of senior adults in the national media. The participants were between […]

Aging and Social Justice:  A slow-motion virtual conference

By Celeste Pang, University of Toronto As we have all seen, COVID-19 has been a tip of an iceberg, exposing deep layers of social stratification and inequities. From the mass deaths in long-term care and nursing homes and exposure of the working conditions of care workers, to Black Lives Matter demonstrations and the violent responses […]

In and outside the nursing home: On the (im)possibilities of meaningful contact while being held apart

By Natashe Lemos Dekker, Laura Vermeulen, and Jeannette Pols   Weer n dag zonder jou te voelen. De alzheimer-kelk moet helemaal leeg Maanden los van elkaar; corona ons kruis, heeft elkaar doen verlaten Nog nooit zo-lang gescheiden; nog nooit zo dicht bij de dood Nooit-zo voelde ik de kracht van aanraken, nu het er niet […]

On Vulnerability, Resilience, and Age: Older Americans Reflect on the Pandemic

By Sarah Lamb, with Ji Chen, Claire Ogden, Tirtza Schramm, and Lin Xinbei Every morning, Americans wake up to fresh news of the heavy toll the coronavirus pandemic is exerting upon vulnerable older people—from the likelihood of developing a more severe form of Covid-19, to the risks of isolation and mental health problems as they […]

How is the pandemic affecting people with dementia? A case study

By Dena Shenk, PhD and Andrea Freidus, PhD, Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina Charlotte Our team is completing a rapid appraisal study of the perceptions of frontline long-term care (LTC) workers in a southern state about care during the COVID-19 pandemic.  One specific area of heightened concern is caring for people with dementia in […]

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