Author Archives: Jason A Danely

About Jason A Danely

Jason Danely is President of AAGE since 2017. He is Senior Lecturer of Anthropology and an affiliate of the Centre for Medical Humanities at Oxford Brookes University. He has been conducting fieldwork-based ethnographic research looking at aging, caring, grief, and ritual in Japan since 2005. His book, Aging and Loss: Mourning and Maturity in Contemporary Japanwas published in 2014 by Rutgers University Press. He is also editor of Transitions and Transformations: Cultural Perspectives on Aging and the Life Course (Berghahn 2013). From 2011-2015, he served as Editor-in-Chief of Anthropology & Aging, the journal of AAGE. He has received awards from the Fulbright Foundation, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, the Center on Age & Community, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, and the University of California Pacific Rim Research Program. His current research is supported by the Enhancing Life award from the John Templeton Foundation, and is a cross-cultural comparison of the lived experiences of family caregivers of older adults in Japan and the UK. He received his PhD in Anthropology from the University of California, San Diego.

AAGE at SfAA 2017

The 2017 Society for Applied Anthropology meetings are fast approaching (March 28- April 1), and, as always, AAGE members will not only be presenting work, but hosting a networking breakfast event for members, students, and anyone interested in learning more about us.

Thank you to Iveris Martinez for compiling this list of relevant sessions at this year’s conference. Continue reading

Thinking back to #AAA2016, and forward to #AAA2017!

If you weren’t lucky enough to be at #AAA2016 “Evidence, Accident, Discovery,” you may have missed not only one of the coldest AAA meetings on record (seriously, we had a blizzard), but in many ways one of the more surreal, as a new President had been elected only a week earlier, with huge looming implications for many of the people we work with. Now, the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association is a massive event and stimulation overload to begin with, but 2016 had the added element of thousands of mourners all at different stages in the grieving process (denial, anger, bargaining, depression). For me, I couldn’t be more grateful that to be in a convention center with like-minded people who care about things like climate change and indigenous rights, care of immigrants and refugees, justice for victims of violence, dignity for the disabled and for women and for older people. I was hardly alone in feeling proud to be part of an organization that so quickly responded to the new political climate where our discipline, as one that has long defended tolerance and empathy, is directly under threat. Not only did the executive board swiftly issue official statements, and dedicate an issue of Anthropology News to work on anthropologist activism, but many sections like the Society for Psychological Anthropology have started their own advocacy networks to organize and affect policy issues.
Next year, AAA will rumble up to the seat of power, Washington DC, and we’ll see what a year of organizing can produce (I’m guessing more than just some nice powerpoint slides).

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