Month: April 2016

Futures Past: Absent Kinships and the Japanese Child Welfare System

Assigned to write about “futures” in the context of childhood, I find myself dwelling on the past. Although approaches to childhood often must grapple with how “the child” is seen to signify the future (of a family, of a town, of a nation, of humanity), within child welfare systems, which are the context of my […]

Who Wouldn’t Want to Retire in Vancouver?: #SfAA2016 Conference Report

Vancouver is a beautiful city, often topping the list of best cities in the world to live and retire in. It is not surprising that this year’s SfAA meeting was the most well-attended ever. Quite a few of us interested in the anthropology of aging and life course issues were there. While gazing at the […]

“Time is no longer a river”: Reflections on life, death, and youth in the digital age

This post is part of the Life Course Collaborative Research Network blog exchange, also available on the website of ACYIG. To see all of the posts in the series, click here. In a recent editorial about how our “overdocumented lives” are making it more difficult to let go of the past, Susanna Schrobsdorff writes: Most […]

Growing old and growing up: Teaching and learning about death

This post is part of the Life Course Collaborative Research Network blog exchange, also available on the website of ACYIG. To see all of the posts in the series, click here. In 2004, as part of my research regarding the beliefs in ‘strigoi’ (a term referring to dead people who come back to harm and […]

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